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Laura Sommerville

Digital Marketing Student at The University of Georgia

#BritneyEverAfter

#BritneyEverAfter

Lifetime Network is not known for its well developed storylines, accurate depictions of true events, or excellent casting (and acting). The network recently released "Britney Ever After," a TV movie about Britney Spears' life and career. The unauthorized depiction of Ms. Spears' life covers everything from her time in The Mickey Mouse Club to her head shaving episode to her recent comeback. In a shocking twist, the movie was received extremely well by audiences. Just kidding. As expected, social media users creatively and eloquently tore it to shreds. Here are some of my favorite critiques:

Despite the negative feedback, Lifetime still found the courage to live tweet the movie and retweet the few positive responses they received. 

Social media has transformed the film and TV industry. Before Twitter, hashtags and live-tweeting, people relied on word-of-mouth and traditional reviews to find out how amazing (or horrible) a television event or movie was. For producers, network execs and everyone else behind the camera, audience feedback was equally inaccessible. Now, social media users get to engage with (and trash) anyone and everyone involved with the movie that they can find a Twitter handle for. And those on the receiving end of the criticism get to watch in horror as their creation is picked apart minute by minute.

Maybe its all a ruse and Lifetime has a deal with Twitter: "Hey Twitter! We'll produce horrible TV movies if you pay us for all of the traffic we'll drive to your site." Probably not, but what's life without a few conspiracy theories. 

 

Dopplenamers

Dopplenamers

Chuck's My Mainland Name

Chuck's My Mainland Name